10 symbols of Russia in photos

10 symbols of Russia in photos
Photo credit : user -Erap .Commons Wikipedia.

1. "Saint Basil's" Cathedral in Moscow, a well known piece of Russian architecture.

Saint Basil's Cathedral

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2. The balalaika is a Russian stringed musical instrument with a characteristic triangular body and three strings.

The balalaika


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3. Samovar

A samovar , literally "self-boiler", is a heated metal container traditionally used to heat and boil water in and around Russia, as well as in other Central, South-Eastern, Eastern European countries, Kashmir and in the Middle-East.


Russian samovar
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Samovar set with cups
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4. The Bayan

The bayan is a type of chromatic button accordion developed in Russia in the early 20th century and named after the 11th-century bard Boyan.
Credit : Wikipedia


Russian Bayan
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5. Podstakannik
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The podstakannik , or tea glass holder, is a holder with a handle, most commonly made of metal that holds a drinking glass (stakan). Their primary purpose is to be able to hold a very hot glass of tea, which is usually consumed right after it is brewed. The stability of the glass on the table is also significantly improved. It is a traditional way of serving and drinking tea in Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and other post-Soviet states.

Russian tea cups
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Russian tea cup holder
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Russian tea glass cup holder
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6. Gzhel.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gzhel is a Russian style of ceramics which takes its name from the village of Gzhel and surrounding area, where it has been produced since 1802.

Russian Gzhel
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Russian art gzhel
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7. Khokhloma

Khokhloma or Khokhloma painting is the name of a Russian wood painting handicraft style and national ornament, known for its vivid flower patterns, red and gold colors over a black background, and the effect it has when applied to wooden tableware or furniture, making it look heavier and metal-like.
Credit : Wikipedia.

Khokhloma painting
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Russian paintin on wood
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8. Russian lacquer art
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Russian lacquer art developed from the art of icon painting which came to an end with the collapse of Imperial Russia. The icon painters, who previously had been employed by supplying not only churches but private homes, needed a way to make a living. Thus, the craft of making papier-mache decorative boxes and panels developed, the items were lacquered and then hand painted by the artists, often with scenes from folk tales.

Russian lacquer art
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Russian chochloma painting
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Great russian painting

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9. Valenki
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Valenki are traditional Russian winter footwear, essentially felt boots: the name valenok literally means "made by felting". Valenki are made of wool felt. They are not water-resistant, and are often worn with galoshes to keep water out and protect the soles from wear and tear. Valenki were once the footwear of choice for many Russians, but in the second half of the 20th century they lost most of their appeal in cities, due to their association with rustic dress.

Russian valenki

10. Matryoshka doll
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A matryoshka doll, also known as Russian nesting doll or Russian doll, refers to a set of wooden dolls of decreasing size placed one inside the other. The first Russian nested doll set was made in 1890 by Vasily Zvyozdochkin from a design by Sergey Malyutin, who was a folk crafts painter at Abramtsevo. Traditionally the outer layer is a woman, dressed in a sarafan, a long and shapeless traditional Russian peasant jumper dress. The figures inside may be of either gender; the smallest, innermost doll is typically a baby turned from a single piece of wood. Much of the artistry is in the painting of each doll, which can be very elaborate.

Russian matreshki
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Matryoshka doll
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Russian nesting doll
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 The first Russian nested doll set
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